worship time vs worship songs

3 02 2010

(This is a continuation from last week’s post on song’s for the journey versus songs to God.)

One of the reasons this topic came up was because of David Crowder Band. First off, I’ve never been a fan. I don’t dislike them, I just don’t get their lyricism. I like their style, though, music and hair.

I had to figure out why I didn’t feel like a majority of their songs belonged in a worship set. Yet trusting the people at sixstepsrecords, I also had to accept that they definitely┬áplay a role in the music ministry under Passion.

After looking at the lyrics I realized so much of their songs revolve around the journey, reminding us of who God has made us and what He has done. The songs are often directed toward the singer (not Crowder, I just mean whoever is singing).

These are songs for the journey. Songs for the journey remind us of God’s work and reaffirm God’s Word to us. They are more often than not songs to us and for us.

There is nothing wrong with these songs when constructed according to Scripture. But why are these songs not worship songs?

If you notice when you find worship in Scripture, it is toward somebody or something. If we are singing to ourselves and it’s worship, then it would be self-worship, thus idol worship. But if they are not worship songs to us and affirm Truth, then what are they? They are songs for the journey.

So, can these songs be good to sing in church? Yes.

The danger in using these types of songs is that they can make us feel good about us and we lose focus on God. This is where the worship leader must construct a purposeful flow so that these songs can be instruments to launch the gathering into worship.

Though, not worship songs, they can be used in worship times because they reflect Truth about God. These songs become instruments of worship when they remind us of God and His goodness to us. When this happens they become fuel for songs that are directed toward God.

Worship songs can be enhanced by songs for the journey during worship times. We must be careful, though, not to pack our worship times with songs for the journey and neglect songs to God, or else we will have no worship time at all. If we lean toward one at the expense of the other, it must be with songs toward God.

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songs for the journey, songs to God

27 01 2010

There are times I feel like a worship jerk. I am driven to help the church understand worship; but in this process I have to draw a line that eliminates good songs from falling under the worship banner.

For example:

The lyrics:

Where you go I go
What you say I say
What you pray I pray

Jesus only did, What he saw you do
He would only say, What he heard you speak
He would only move, When he felt you lead
Following your heart, Following your
spirit

How could I expect to walk without you
When every move that Jesus made was in surrender
I would not begin to live without you
For you alone are worthy you are always good

You are always good
You are always good
Always good
Always good

Though the world sees and soon forgets
We will not forget
Who you are and what you’ve done for us
What you’ve done for us

You are my God

When I look at the lyrics I have to say the song isn’t a worship song. The lyrics “You are always good” and “You are my God” are the only lyrics I could consider to fall under the definition of worship, which in simple terms is giving a response to God because of who He is.

The other lyrics talk about the way Jesus lived and how the church should live in response to His example.

Nothing is wrong with the song. It’s just not a song that worships God.

This type of song is what I’d call a song for the journey on the road of God’s transformation.

Do I think like song should be sung in church? Yes, but the song itself cannot serve as a worship song.

I’ll discuss more about worship times versus worship songs next post, but I want to set a foundation leading into the next post.

Just because a song is biblical truth, does not mean it qualifies as a worship song. There is a reason for the distinction, but we’ll have to wait until the next post.